The biggest no-brainer purchase EVER!

I’m doing a new challenge, one I’ve decided not to blog about until it’s complete.  Well, I guess I’m breaking my own rule here, as the challenge is for 2 months and I haven’t even completed the first month.  The challenge is to buy nothing new.  This excludes groceries and toiletries, of course.  I’m keeping a list of things I would have bought or potentially bought.  In the first 10 days, my imaginary purchases totalled over $500!!!  Seriously.

scotts push mowerYesterday, I made a purchase.  It’s one I’ve been considering for a while.  I bought a lawn mower.  Not just any lawn mower, a manual push mower.  I weighed all the pros and cons, and the answer was clear.  Buy it now.

Pros

  • Save $.  I’m saving $810 a year, as I had a yard service.  I’m not lazy, just busy.  Besides, my yard tools caught on fire several years ago and I just knew that was a sign from God to get a yard guy.  :)
  • Help global warming.  A typical gas-powered mower used for one hour is the same emissions equivalent of driving your car for 100 miles. (about.com)
  • Eco-friendly.  This shocked me.  More gas is spilled refueling mowers each year than the oil spill from the Exxon Valdez.  Wow. (EPA)  Continue reading

17 days until Christmas…

It was clear to me this morning at 5:30am what I needed to write about, a new and unexpected Christmas cheer.  Yesterday’s schedule was filled with ‘tinselectomy‘ opportunities and I had an expectation of how each of them would play out.  I was so off base, but it made me understand how I and other people are experiencing a transformation to humble altruism.

Amy had a wonderful idea, to feed the guys in downtown Frisco, the men that are desperately looking for any available work to feed their families.  They stand outside the Exxon, rain or shine, and I know that because it was raining yesterday.  Amy posted this lunch idea on Facebook last week.  Nancy saw it, and loved the idea so much, she planned to do this.  It ended up that all three of us got together and prepared 30 lunches to take to these guys.

Our everyday beaten paths lead us down Main street regularly, enough to know that we would have enough lunches, but not enough to know if these guys would be outside in the very cold rain.   As we approached, they were there, all of them, scanning the passing cars with a hopeful look that someone would have a paid task for them.  As I drove into the parking lot, I didn’t even come to a stop before there were at least 12 men swarming around the car.  We had to wait for them to step away from the doors so we could get out to give them the lunch bags we had prepared.

As we passed out the lunch sacks, all of them were very polite and said “gracias”, Amy and I responded with “de nada”, one of the ten Spanish words we know.  Then Nancy starts having a conversation with them in Spanish.  Who knew?  Oh, she is SO going to Casa Hogar Elim soon!  Nancy was asking if they had any friends that were out on jobs or if anyone was inside, because we would leave lunches for them.  They were so happy to get the lunches and so polite, we had to persuade them to take extras or take some for their friends.  Most of them were well into their sandwiches before we drove out of the parking lot.  Continue reading